Can I get Worms from my Dog?

The following questions about potential health risks intestinal parasites may pose for people are frequently asked at I-20 Animal Medical Center. Understanding the risks and how parasitic infections can be transmitted to people is key to ensuring your family’s health.

What is parasitic zoonosis?

The definition of zoonosis is: “a disease of animals that may be transmitted to man”. Some parasitic infections in pets can be transmitted between animals and people. The most common zoonotic internal parasites in pets are roundworms, tapeworms and hookworms.

Who is at risk?

Young children are especially at risk. Children are not always careful of hygiene, and are likely to play in dirt, grass or sand and then place their fingers or hands in their mouths.

How are these infections transmitted?

Children become infected by playing in soil or sand that is contaminated with fecal matter and then putting their hands or contaminated objects in their mouths. Hookworm larvae can also penetrate the human skin.

When are these parasites a problem?

Internal parasite eggs and larvae are virtually everywhere in the environment and can survive in the soil for years waiting to infect pets or people. Some species thrive in warm climates while others proliferate in colder regions. This is why routine deworming and preventive steps are so important.

Where can I get more information?

It’s easy to keep your family and pets healthy by routinely deworming your pet. Heartworm preventatives protect against heartworms AND intestinal parasites. See your veterinarian for more information on parasites, prevention and the most complete treatment available for your pets.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists (AAVP) recommend strategic deworming.

How to prevent parasite infection

You can protect your family and pets from parasite infections by following these simple preventive measures.

  • Deworm your dog on a regular schedule as recommended by your veterinarian. This removes internal parasites and prevents further contamination of the environment.
  • Practice good hygiene. Wash hands regularly, especially after handling pets or cleaning up pet waste.
  • Remove pet droppings from your yard at least 2-3 times a week- although daily is best.
  • Thoroughly wash fruits and vegetables before eating.
  • Keep your pet flea-free. Ingestion of fleas can transmit tapeworms to people.
  • Do not allow children to go barefoot, sit or lie on playgrounds or in parks where they are exposed to animal stools. Hookworm larvae can penetrate the skin
  • Clean cat litter boxes daily, and wash hands afterward.
  • Do not drink water from streams, lakes or other sources that may be contaminated with animal feces.
  • Keep pets clean; bathe pet after deworming.

The doctors and staff at I-20 Animal Medical Center are committed to your pet’s health for wellness exams, vaccinations and emergency care. I-20 Animal Medical Center is a 24-hour double accredited (general medicine and emergency/ critical care) AAHA certified hospital. For more information call us at 817-478-9238.

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Heat Stroke Alert!

If you own a dog, please read carefully. We have had 5 heat stroke cases this past week at I-20 Animal Medical Center (3 pets were euthanized because of the severity of heatstroke). These are heartbreaking cases, because the owners of these pets had no idea that it could be so easy for their four-legged family member to get heat-stroke.

What You Should Know

Don’t think that just because your pet won’t be outside for long, that there isn’t a risk for heat stroke. There can be many reasons why a pet is more prone to heatstroke – and you can’t always predict who may be at risk. You can’t assume your pet won’t have a problem. If your pet goes outside in this extreme summer heat there is potential for heat stroke whether or not your yard is shaded, or your pet has water, or that your pet has never had a problem.

Factors that Make Your Pet At Risk For Heat Stroke:

Each pet owner has to understand that certain factors influence your dog’s susceptibility to heat stroke even if your pet is properly cared for. Your dog may be in an environment or situation you thought was safe, and yet suddenly, inexplicably, you have a pet stricken with heat stroke.

If your pet is a bracheocephalic breed (short muzzle and “smushed” in face typical of Boston Terriers, Bulldogs and other similar breeds) your dog is EXTREMELY at risk for heat prostration or heat stroke. Why? Well, dogs don’t sweat to cool themselves down, they pant. But, listen to how Bulldogs and other similar breeds breathe – very, very noisy- all due to restricted airways. Some dogs have a smaller than normal trachea (windpipe) – a condition they were born with, and a condition that will make a dog prone to heat stroke. Less air flows through a small trachea which leads to the inability to cool efficiently. To compensate they pant more to try to cool down, which is increased exertion and builds up heat. Now they have to pant more to cool down, but can’t, which leads to a very dangerous situation. It doesn’t take much, in this heat, to overexert these dogs and in a very short time have heat prostration and/or heat stroke.

What other dogs are at risk? Overweight dogs are at risk. Dogs with heavy hair coats are at risk. Dogs on tranquilizers are at risk. Older dogs are at risk. Dogs not used to outdoor heat are at risk if left outside unattended. Don’t assume that if they have shade and water your dog is not as risk.

You might think as veterinarians we are dramatizing the dangers, but we really can’t emphasize enough how easily heat stroke can occur. Owners of heatstroke patients we have treated have made comments such as “I let my dog go outside for only 10 minutes and he collapsed”, or “He was outside for no longer than 30 minutes”, or “We went for only a 10 minute walk and he collapsed” and “He was chasing a squirrel for only a few minutes” For at-risk pets it doesn’t take long to develop heat stroke.

Please, be extra careful with your pet this summer!

What To Do:

If you suspect heat stroke, try to verify by taking the temperature rectally. Normal temperature is between 101 and 102 degrees. Place cool (not ice) water on your pet, covering the entire body. Next, take your dog to the Animal ER IMMEDIATELY. Speed of treatment is critical in heat stroke victims. Any delay of treatment may lessen the chances of your pet surviving.

Tips for Avoiding Heatstroke:

  • Walk your dog early in the morning, evenings are too hot
  • Avoid walks and other outdoor activities for the overweight dog, older dog and bracheocephalic breeds
  • Don’t allow your dog to ride in the back of the pick up truck
  • Never tie your dog up in the yard
  • Make sure your yard has shade and adequate water
  • Supply large amounts of water
  • Never leave your dog in the car, even for a few minutes
  • Remember that strictly Indoor dogs may not be able to tolerate any extended time outside, keep them indoors
  • Monitor your pet outdoors if your pet is a at risk breed or has conditions that put it at risk
  • Consider a wading pool filled with water for the outdoor dog

I-20 Animal Medical Center is a 24-hour state-of-the-art hospital AAHA accredited practice. We are fully equipped with x-ray, laboratory capabilities, ultrasound, and surgical facilities (including laser surgery). Services include routine vaccinations, health checks, surgery and dentistry. As a 24-hour hospital, we have doctors and nurses on staff around the clock to provide emergency and critical care. For more information about our hospital or our doctors, call 817-478-9238 or metro 972-263-2525.

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Preventing Pet Emergencies

Pet emergencies are sudden and unexpected, and usually happen when we least expect them. Many of the emergencies we see in dogs and cats can be prevented. Below are ways to prevent some of the most common emergencies we see in veterinary medicine.

Should my pet be eating that?

Know which foods your pets should avoid. They include chocolate, coffee, alcohol, grapes, raisins, sugarless gum and desserts containing sugar-free Xylitol, onions, garlic, avocados, macadamia nuts and any moldy food.

Teach your pet swimming pool survival skills

Prevent swimming pool tragedies. Teach your pet not only how to swim, but where the steps are located so that they know how to get out. Don’t assume they won’t ever fall in when you aren’t around, it happens all too often.

Consider rattlesnake vaccination

If you live in an area with rattlesnakes and/ or copperhead snakes consider rattlesnake vaccination. Although if a snake bite occurs, treatment is still vital, the vaccine will lessen the severity of the effects making treatment more effective.

Keep pets in the back yard or on a leash

This prevents your pet from being hit by a car, being injured in a fight (bite wounds) and being exposed to poisons. It also minimizes the risk of exposure of cats to contagious diseases such as Feline Leukemia and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (Feline AIDS). The City of Arlington as well as many other cities require that dogs and cats be confined at all times. This means in the back yard or on a leash.

Keep electric cords from chewing puppies

Keep electric cords out of reach of chewing puppies. A surprising number of puppies and young dogs are treated in our animal ER each year for electric shock after biting into an electric cord. Electric shock can cause fluid build-up in the lungs (pulmonary edema) and can cause death. Seek treatment immediately.

Don’t let dogs ride in the back of the pick up truck

Many patients have been seriously injured by either falling or jumping from the back of a moving truck. A pet jumping out of a truck during heavy traffic could also cause a serious car wreck. They can also be injured by sudden starts and stops. Even if they are not injured, they may become lost if they jump out and you don’t know it.

Cap metal lawn edging with plastic, or replace with a non-metal type

We see numerous patients with paw lacerations from metal lawn edging. (This is also a hazard to humans going barefooted.) Capping metal lawn edgings or replacing with non-metal lawn edgings will prevent accidents.

Keep cats away from lily plants and flowers

Lily plants and flowers are toxic to cats. Even the pollen is toxic. Toxicity can occur even when your cat eats less than one leaf. If your cat comes into contact with pollen, wash your cat immediately. Kidney damage can occur and the sooner you treat the less chance of permanent kidney damage.

Prevent heat stroke

Make sure outdoor pets have access to plenty of shade and fresh water, and never leave a pet in an automobile with the windows rolled up. During the warm months, temperatures inside cars with closed windows can become high enough to produce heat stroke in only a few minutes. Don’t take dogs jogging during the hottest part of the day. They don’t sweat like we do, and consequently they don’t regulate their temperature as efficiently as humans do.

Keep over-the-counter and prescription medications where pets can’t get them

Drugs like Tylenol and ibuprofen can be toxic to pets, especially cats. Even though veterinarians often prescribe human drugs for pets, they carefully insure proper dosing. For example, a digoxin tablet prescribed for a human could cause death in a 4-pound Yorkie.

Keep Rat baits out of the reach of pets

Rodents are always a problem in Texas, but especially during the warm months. There are 3 different types of rat bait available for over-the-counter use, and many are routinely used. All 3 types are toxic to pets, so sure you set them in a place that your pet can’t get to. Seek emergency care immediately if you think your dog has ingested rat bait. Bring the box the poison came in, so that we can determine what the active ingredients are to ensure proper treatment. Pet owners may place rat baits in areas THEY THINK are not accessible by their pet, only to find out that their pet has dug, or burrowed or wiggled their way through the barricades, shelves or barriers to find and consume the rat bait.

Keep pets away from Antifreeze

Keep antifreeze in closed containers where pets do not have access. Watch for antifreeze that has drained from cars into streets or driveways – a few laps from antifreeze that has dripped or leaked out from a car is enough to cause toxicity. Antifreeze contains a substance, ethylene glycol, which is very toxic to kidneys. It is also very sweet, which is the tragic reason so many pets are poisoned by it each year. If you see your pet drinking antifreeze, seek veterinary treatment immediately! There is a non-toxic antifreeze, called Sierra®, which can be used safely around pets.

Keep string, thread and sewing needles away from cats

There is something about a needle and thread, or even string that apparently intrigues cats. Surprisingly, we see quite a few cats each year that have swallowed thread and become critically ill. Thread damages intestines as it tries to move through. Usually exploratory surgery is required to remove the thread or string.

The doctors and staff at I-20 Animal Medical Center, located in South Arlington off of Interstate 20, are committed to your pet’s health for wellness exams, vaccinations and emergency care. Doctors and nurses are on the premises 24 hours a day to provide emergency care any time- days, nights or weekends. I-20 Animal Medical Center is a double accredited (general medicine and emergency/ critical care) AAHA certified hospital. For additional information you can call us at 817-478-9238.

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Xylitol- The Artificial Sweetner that is Toxic to Pets

Chewing gum and other products containing the artificial sweetner xylitol can be toxic for your pet. Sugar-free gum is the most common item, but xylitol can also be found in jam, syrups, candy, chocolate, mints and many dental products such as toothpaste (why you should not use human toothpaste on your dog).

Wikipedia

How Much Xylitol is Dangerous?

It doesn’t take much xylitol to cause toxicity in pets. A 10 lb dog can be poisoned with as little as a stick and a half of sugar free gum containing xylitol. A 70 lb dog would be poisoned with only 10 to 11 pieces of gum.

Clinical Signs

Clinical symptoms of toxicity can appear in as little as 30 minutes after ingestion. Xylitol can cause low blood sugar, vomiting, weakness, ataxia, depression, low potassium levels, liver dysfunction, seizures and coma.

What If My Pet Ingests Xylitol

Don’t wait. Take your pet to an emergency animal hospital immediately. At I-20 we have doctors on staff 24 hours so that we can treat immediately. Don’t wait to see if your pet is going to show signs of toxicity. Time is critical. We treat a surprising number of pets with xylitol toxicity (gum is apparently a favored item with pets!) with success, but time is crucial.

Knowing that xylitol is toxic to pets can help you prevent an accidental poisoning.

The following products contain xylitol (but this is not a complete list)

Orbit gum
Trident gum
Stride gum
Ice Breakers gum
Altoids
Biotene Mouthwash
Breath Rx
ThereaBreath toothpaste & mouthwash
Mint Asure
FreshBreath capsules
Smint “xylicare”
Some canine dental products contain Xylitol- but with approved non toxic levels
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Castration in Cats

Castration is the surgical removal of the testicles. Kittens as young as 12 weeks of age can be neutered. Advantages of castration consist of reducing the unwanted kitten population and elimination of the behavioral problems associated with intact male cats.

Male cats, under the influence of testosterone, develop behavior characteristics that are a detriment to your cat’s health as well as sometimes annoying to us humans.

Cats that fight with other cats are exposed to Feline leukemina, Feline AIDS virus along with a variety of other diseases. If you have a multiple cat household, your cat could bring home these diseases to your other cats.

Abscesses commonly form from fighting, and can result in multiple trips to the vet hospital to treat infection. There can be times that abscesses become so severe that areas of skin literally slough away from the extreme infections that form from cat fights.

Roaming exposes cats to environmental dangers such as car accidents and other traumas. Poisoning from toxicities such as antifreeze or poisonous plants is also something we see in our animal ER.

A tomcat will mark territory by spraying various surfaces with urine. Urine from intact males is particularly strong and pungent, so spraying can be a detriment when your furniture is the target. Spraying, yowling, roaming, are fighting are tomcat characteristics that are markedly improved with castration.

Our doctor will examine your cat prior to anesthesia and surgery. Blood work is recommended to help ensure that kidney, blood and liver values are all within normal range.

A mild sedative and pain medication is given before surgery. Pain medication given prior to surgery actually helps to relieve more pain than when given after surgery. Research has shown that when we control pain, and make our patients more comfortable there is faster healing and recovery.

An IV injection is given to induce anesthesia. The patient is maintained during surgery in a controlled plane of anesthesia with an inhalant anesthetic, isoflurane. The surgery, removal of the testicles, is performed under full anesthesia. Because of the type of anesthesia protocol we use, we are able to discharge our patients the same day as surgery.

Although general anesthesia and surgery always involve a certain amount of risk, it is unlikely that your cat will have any serious problem with his surgery. If your pet licks excessively or chews excessively at the incision, loses appetite, seems lethargic or any other issue you have a question about, please immediately give us a call. A little licking is OK, persistent licking is not. Because there are no skin sutures, you will not need to make another trip to the hospital to have the sutures removed.

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Neutering (castration) of Dogs

Neutering or castration is the surgical removal of a male dog’s testicles. The parts that are removed are the parts that are needed for reproduction.

Advantages

The primary advantage is sterilization. This helps with population control, prevents spreading of disease and helps reduce roaming, aggression, and dominance (because castration removes the source of testosterone production).

Because castration removes the main source of testosterone, medical conditions related to the production of testosterone can be prevented. These include enlargement of the prostate, prostatic abscesses and certain types of tumors around the anus (perianal or perineal adenomas). Even after these conditions occur, castration will be recommended because it will help improve these conditions.

Puppies can be neutered as young as 12 weeks of age. Advantages of neutering early include:

  • Dogs neutered at a young age have fewer behavioral problems
  • Surgery is generally faster, easier because puppies are not fully developed
  • Faster, easier surgery means fewer anesthetic risks and faster healing
  • Puppies bleed less compared to older dogs, making the surgery post operative care easier and less painful.

Prior to surgery

Prior to surgery the doctor will do a physical examination to ensure there are no health issues that will interfere with your pet’s safety during anesthesia. Prior to anesthesia lab work is recommended to rule out potential kidney, liver or blood disorders.

A mild sedative and pain mediation is given before surgery. When given prior to surgery pain medication will help to relieve more pain than when given after surgery. Research has shown that controlling pain, and making our patients more comfortable leads to faster healing and smoother recovery.

Anesthesia

Prior to anesthesia we place an IV catheter so that we can give injections as well as administerIV fluids throughout surgery. IV fluids are given to maintain blood pressure and help protect kidney function. Initially an intravenous injection of a drug or combination of drugs is given to induce anesthesia. The patient is maintained during surgery in a controlled anesthetic plane with an inhalant anesthetic, isoflurane. Using a combination of anesthetic drugs helps contribute to a steady plane of anesthesia during surgery, as well as quick recovery after surgery. Because of the type of anesthesia protocol we use, we are able to discharge our patients the same day as surgery. Maintenance and monitoring Our hospital uses Pulse Oximetry equipment, which is a non-invasive method of monitoring of the oxygenation of the patient’s blood oxygen level. The slightest change from normal levels will trigger an alarm giving the doctor an advantage of being able to respond quickly to any problem with blood oxygenation. A trained veterinary technician, who stays with the patient during the entire surgery monitors Temperature, respiration rate, and continuous EKG (cardiac rate and rhythm).

Surgery

We carefully clip and do a surgical preparation of the scrotum and surrounding area prior to surgery. The doctor will make an incision into the scrotal sac and remove the testicles. Vastectomies (which consist of ligating the ducts that care the sperm) are rarely done in dogs., Older dogs tend to have more hemorrhage (blood vessels more developed), than puppies, so older, mature dogs will tend to have more swelling and bruising.

Recovery

After surgery, we transport your pet to an area for anesthetic recovery. Because of the type of anesthesia protocol used, and the pain medications given, your pet will have a smooth recovery and will be ready to go home later that day.

Home care

Once you are home, offer only small amounts of water at first – give your dog some time to adjust to water and food after surgery. If he does well with small amounts, you can increase the amount you offer. Restrict her exercise for 7 to 10 days, if she is very active, consider walking her on a leash outside. Watch to make sure she is not excessively licking or chewing at the incision. Make sure you give her pain medication that she received when discharged from the hospital. Pain medication works best when given consistently. If you miss a dose you are “chasing the pain”, and pain control will not be as effective. And, as always, we are here 24 hours a day. Please call with any question, day or night. We are here to help!

Possible complications

Although general anesthesia and surgery always involve a certain amount of risk, it is unlikely that your dog will have any serious problem with her surgery. If your pet licks excessively or chews excessively at the incision, loses appetite, seems lethargic or any other issue you have a question about, please immediately give us a call. Some patients will need to live with an E-collar (lampshade around the neck) a few days to prevent licking or chewing. A little licking is OK, persistent licking is not.

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Ovariohysterectomies in Dogs (Spay)

Ovariohysterectomies in dogs is a surgery that involves removing the uterus and ovaries. This procedure can be performed in puppies as young as 12 weeks. Although this surgery is sometimes considered a “routine surgery”, it is in fact a major surgery requiring general anesthesia and sterile operating techniques.

Usually the reason for surgery is to prevent pregnancy and estrus (heat period), but it can be necessary when treating medical conditions, such as severe uterine infections, ovarian and uterine tumors.

Advantages A popular advantage of spaying is the elimination of the heat period- which occurs every 6 months, and lasts up to 3 weeks. Estrus in dogs can be messy and time consuming, and even with the best of care, accidents can happen resulting in pregnancy.

Dogs, just like people, have mammary cancer. Dogs spayed while they are young, especially prior to their first heat cycle, rarely have mammary cancer when they age. Uterine infection is another health risk that is eliminated with spaying your dog. The advantages for spaying definitely outweigh the disadvantages.
Prior to surgery Our doctor will do a physical examination prior to surgery to ensure there are no health issues that will interfere with your pet’s safety during anesthesia. Also prior to anesthesia, lab work is recommended to rule out potential kidney, liver or blood disorders.
A mild sedative and pain medication is given before surgery. Pain medication given prior to surgery actually helps to relieve more pain than when given after surgery. Research has shown that when we control pain, and make our patients more comfortable there is faster healing and recovery.

Anesthesia An IV catheter is placed prior to surgery so that we can give multiple injections and keep your pet on IV fluids during surgery. IV fluids are administered to maintain blood pressure and help protect kidney function. An IV injection of a drug or combination of drugs is given to induce anesthesia. The patient is maintained during surgery in a controlled plane of anesthesia with an inhalant anesthetic, isoflurane. Using a combination of anesthetic drugs helps contribute to a steady plane of anesthesia, as well as quick recovery after surgery. Because of the type of anesthesia protocol we use, we are able to discharge our patients the same day as surgery. Maintenance and monitoring Our hospital uses Pulse Oximetry equipment, which is a non-invasive method of monitoring the oxygenation of the patient’s blood. The slightest change from normal levels will trigger an alarm giving the doctor an advantage of being able to respond quickly to any problem. A trained veterinary technician stays with the patient during the entire surgery, monitors temperature, respiration rate, and continuous EKG (cardiac rate and rhythm). Our surgery veterinary nurse has cared for and monitored our surgery patients here at I-20 Animal Medical Center for over 30 years.

Surgery Our doctor will make an incision into the abdomen, tie off blood vessels and remove the ovaries and uterus. The medical name for the spay operation is ovariohysterectomy (OHE).

Dogs in estrus can be spayed, but because the surgery is more difficult and time consuming (due to the increased blood circulation of the uterus), there is an increased fee. Also be aware that dogs spayed while in heat can continue to attract male dogs because hormone levels remain high after surgery and the scent may linger. Take precautions that your dog is not exposed to other male dogs until she has had several weeks to heal.

There are many reasons we recommend spaying your dogs while puppies, and prior to their first heat. One reason is that if a dog has a uterine infection, surgery can become complicated with potential serious risks. Picture a uterus filled with purulent exudate (pus). Sometimes there is so much pus present that the uterus will weigh several pounds, depending upon the size of the dog. This type of infection can cause serious health issues and even death. When an old overweight dog is also in heat or has a uterine infection, the operation becomes more complex which can lead to important risk factors.

Recovery After surgery, we transport your pet to an area for anesthetic recovery. Because of the type of anesthesia protocol used, and the pain medications given, including a lidocaine block along the incision line, your pet will have a smooth recovery and will be ready to go home later that day.
Home care Once you are home, offer only small amounts of water at first – give your dog some time to adjust to water and food after surgery. If she does well with small amounts, you can increase the amount you offer. Restrict her exercise for 7 to 10 days, if she is very active, consider walking her on a leash outside. Watch to make sure she is not excessively licking or chewing at the incision. Make sure you give her pain medication that she received when discharged from the hospital. Pain medication works best when given consistently. If you miss a dose you are “chasing the pain”, and pain control will not be as effective. And, as always, we are here 24 hours a day. Please call with any question, day or night. We are here to help! Possible complications Although general anesthesia and surgery always involve a certain amount of risk, it is unlikely that your dog will have any serious problem with her surgery. If your pet licks excessively or chews excessively at the incision, loses appetite, seems lethargic or any other issue you have a question about, please immediately give us a call. Some patients will need to live with an E-collar (lampshade around the neck) a few days to prevent licking or chewing. A little licking is OK, persistent licking is not.

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Allergy Testing

What is causing your dog to itch?

“Itchiness” in dogs is commonly caused by allergies. People with allergies usually have symptoms of watery eyes and a runny nose. But dogs with allergies display different symptoms- they itch.

Dogs with allergies will scratch and chew and /or lick above their tail, sides, thighs, groin and feet. You may see them rubbing their ears or face on the furniture. There may be thinning of the hair coat, bald areas, and scabs from the ongoing licking and chewing.

But, what is it your dog is allergic to? There are hundreds of possibilities.

No one really understands why an individual develops allergies. If your pet’s allergies are severe, or not easily controlled despite treatment, or you feel you over-medicate your pet (especially with steroids which can cause unwanted side-effects), maybe it’s time to look at allergy testing and desensitization injections.

With today’s advances in technology, a blood test is now available that can identify what specifically your dog is allergic to. Any substance that causes an allergy is called an allergen- and this is what the blood test identifies. Once the allergens are identified the laboratory will synthesize the hyposensitization formula unique for your pet so that we can start a schedule of hyposensitization injections. Many of our patients have had dramatic response with hyposensitization injections for allergies.

Hyposensitization injections have up to a 90% success rate, although it may take 3-5 months for results. We can easily teach you how to give injections, or if you prefer, we can give the injection for you. Although hyposensitization is an allergy management system that is usually required for life, the results along with the ability to reduce long-term medications makes it desirable for many of our clients.

What Are the General Symptoms of Allergies in Dogs?

  • Itchy, red skin
  • Licking
  • Chewing
  • Redness
  • Scratching
  • Itchy, runny eyes
  • Itchy back or base of tail (most commonly flea allergy)
  • Ear infections
  • Sneezing
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Snoring caused by an inflamed throat
  • Paw chewing/swollen paws
  • Allergic dogs may also suffer from secondary bacterial or yeast skin infections, which may cause hair loss, scabs or crusts on the skin.

What is hyposensitzation?

It is important to realize that allergies are not “cured”. Instead, hyposensitization increases your pet’s tolerance to the allergens that he or she is allergic to. This retrains your pet’s immune system to deal with future exposure to those allergens, which then reduces or eliminates allergy symptoms. For more information on allergy testing and hyposensitization injections from Spectrum Laboratories.

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Dental Digital Radiography

Dental radiography is very different from the xrays that we use for the rest of the body. Our digital system is a high end intra-oral technology your dentist might use. Only with extremely high resolution, dental sensors, can we look at each tooth or area with precision and accuracy. A ‘regular’ xray shot will not accomplish this. The sensors we chose have nearly double the resolution of most human digital systems. It is that good!

Why Dental Xrays?

  • To see disease process that occur below the gum lines that is not visible during an oral exam, such as periodontal disease, fractured teeth, or tumors.
  • To confirm that the correct teeth are extracted
  • To determine jaw fractures caused by disease teeth
  • For pre-purchase exams for show dogs
  • To the determination and treatment of teeth with root canals

Why digital?

  • Clear, crisp images that can be digitally enhanced for more precise diagnosis.
  • Infinitely more environmentally friendly because it uses no toxic chemicals such as developer and fixer. Regular radiography uses a lot of these chemicals since they have to be changed at least every few days.
  • Immediate images on the computer screen. No waiting for 7 to 10 minutes to see the xray.
  • The images can be stored on the computer and recalled instantly for examination rather than pulling patient charts in some back room or storage facility.
  • The client can take printed copies of their xrays home for future references.
  • We can charge about half the cost since it eliminates chemicals, developing machines, and dramatically reduces labor costs.
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